Category: PC

Metro: Last Light has low FOV, auto-aim turned on by default; how to force DX9

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Metro: Last Light is now out and getting generally favorable reviews. However, an issue has been found that may prove to be a problem during gameplay. The game has a very low field of view and developer 4AGames hasn’t put it any sliders to change it. It can’t even be changed through manual configuration file editing, too.

The game is also a DirectX 10/11 title, but you can force it to run in DX9. DSOGaming has put up a guide on how to do it; as a bonus, they’ve also added a guide on how to turn off auto-aim, which is turned on by default in the PC version.

Finally, a new beta version of GeForce drivers for NVIDIA’s graphics cards is out. The v320.14 drivers are optimized specifically for the game, noting enhanced performance by up to 10%.

Brilliant time-lapse video shows development of Dropchord

Double Fine is freaking awesome when it comes to making good games, and Dropchord is looking to be a great addition to its roster. If you’ve ever wondered how the studio makes its games, then this video is for you.

Senior gameplay programmer Patrick Hackett has put up a time-lapse video of the development of Dropchord. “I regularly captured short videos showing new features or interesting developments,” he writes. “I sped these up and cut them together with one of the tracks from the game.”

And the result is phenomenal. The video shows the evolution of the game’s design, how its appearance changed, and its debut at PAX East this March.

Dropchord is due out on Windows, Mac, and iOS in July.

The Novelist looks intriguing, awaits your vote on Steam Greenlight

The Novelist looks like another great indie game in the making, and it’s being made by Kent Hudson. He’s a former LucasArts developer and game designer who worked on BioShock 2 and Deus Ex: Invisible War, among others.

The game has been put up on Steam Greenlight and looks very interesting. It follows Dan Kaplan, a struggling novelist, and his family as they move to their summer home. You are a ghostly presence in their home, reading their thoughts and guiding their actions. Hopefully, you will help the family reconcile its differences and alter the path Kaplan’s career takes.

The Novelist looks to be a game heavy with rhetoric and choice. It also appears to be an outward expression of the players’ personality and attitude towards career and family. It will also be an exploration of the constitution of people: who they are, what makes them, and who they wish to be. Honestly, I find this game truly intriguing.

It’s being developed for PC and Mac. It may be released on Steam with the help of your precious vote.

BioShock Infinite sold much better than its predecessors, Take-Two still in the red

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In what can only be considered to be not-a-surprise, Take-Two has announced that BioShock Infinite has sold significantly more copies in its first month than its predecessors in the series. In fact, more than 3.7 million copies of the excellent game has been shipped around the world, and there has apparently been “solid demand” for the game’s Season Pass, though no one really knows what DLC they’re going to get.

The publisher, however, isn’t doing so well. Despite having such big successes as BioShock Infinite, Borderlands 2, and NBA 2K13, the company finished the year with a net loss of $29.49 million. Interestingly, it’s better than last year, which saw a $108.82 million deficit.

As for its other successes, Borderlands 2 has shipped 6 million copies since its release, which puts it on track to be the publisher’s best-selling title; NBA 2K13 has shipped 5 million copies. No figures were revealed for Max Payne 3 and XCOM: Enemy Unknown, though both of them were critically acclaimed at release.

The publisher is looking to bank on the launch of GTA 5, which is due out later this year. It’s quite sad that Take-Two is still in the red despite having released so many good games. As a matter of fact, I’ve put countless hours into these games, as have many others, yet I don’t understand how such a publisher can still make a loss.

Mass Effect didn’t have non-humanoid aliens because it would’ve been costly

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There were quite a few alien races represented in the Mass Effect trilogy. Although they may have scales, blue skin, or might even look like roaches, they were basically humans with a palette swap. That’s disturbing, but considering how limited consoles were during this generation, that may have been a necessary step.

Apparently, BioWare thought the same, too, for they considered having non-humanoid squadmates in the games, but they discovered that it would have taken away from the rest of the game.

All the party members in the games were based on the humanoid skeleton because the development effort for non-humanoid playable aliens would have been great. Instead, the studio pushed to make a “larger, more polished game.” Also, all squadmates had to function like human characters in the sense that they’d have to be able to carry guns.

Honestly, I’d love to see the galaxy’s first Hanar spectre in the next Mass Effect game. Now, that would be freaking amazing! Also, I think next-gen consoles have more power and RAM that can be dedicated to render more than one type of “skeleton” in games.

Remember Me was originally set in water; Paris came in much later

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Remember Me was originally slated to have jet skis and would’ve been called “Adrift”. Players would be seen zipping around a flooded coastal city. While that sounds vaguely interesting at first, I believe the game would’ve become boring too easily and would have been dismissed quickly.

Thankfully, that didn’t come to fruition according to the game’s creative director Jean-Maxime Moris. The team had wanted to focus on the effects of global warming on the world, which they why they had wanted to place the game in a city like Sydney, Tokyo, or San Francisco. “The [player] would have to navigate with a wakeboard, grappling from one jet ski to another,” he said.

As it stands, they became more interested in the idea of manipulating memories and shifted the theme away from global warming. Dontnod’s (the studio) home city of Paris became the game’s stomping grounds but with a sci-fi twist. The iconic features of Paris came into view, though Moris explains that they were initially reluctant to be “that French studio doing that French game.”

Honestly, I think the game looks cool. The scenic views of Paris act as great eye candy, especially the new glass-and-steel skyscrapers alongside familiar Parisian landmarks. The interview touches upon the studio’s vision of Paris in the future and how social networks will come to dominate society. It’s an interesting read.

Remember Me is expected to be released early next month on PC, PS3, and Xbox 360.